You’re going to discover how Color Switch creator, David Reichelt, generates ideas for mobile games. It’s a simple process that anyone can use to come up with ideas for business, apps and more!

What is Slice and Dice?

David uses slice and dice technique to come up with mobile game ideas. Slice and dice is a strategy where you can look out into any information and chop it up. This means that you can make a list of attributes of any idea.

For example, a cup has material, size, weight, and shape. It can be hand-held, lightweight, breakable or not breakable. This is an example of how you slice the idea of a cup into all of its attributes that are there, but you can’t visually see.

If you don’t break the specific ideas, you won’t get specific results. If you want to create a brand new cup, slicing the specific ideas of a cup is necessary to deliver a specific result.

Another example is going to the gym. You don’t go to the gym without a goal and randomly do stuff. You either want to tone your abs, arms or legs and do the necessary workout according to your objective.  So, you do a specific routine to get the specific results you want. This is basically how slice and dice works.

How David Creates Color Switch Using Slice and Dice?

There are already a lot of games back in the 70s and 80s that use color switching but not as the main idea. It was always some side element. It wasn’t considered as something important on its own.

PacMan, Mario, and Uno all show color switching at some point of its gameplay but only as a side mechanic.  David did a slice and dice of these games and noticed this and decided to make color switching the main mechanic of his game.

Then he used another technique called scamper in which each letter stands for different ways to manipulate an idea. P stands for “put to some other use,” and this is what David did.He took the mechanic of color switching and put it to another use, this time as the main theme of the game. Since he did something different from the previous games, he got different results in terms of how the game was designed and how well it did.

 

 

Steve Young

Founder at AppMasters
I started building apps in 2011 and my first app hit #8 under educational games. I started making a few hundred dollars a month, but had no idea what I was doing. Then in 2013 I decided to start a podcast so I could pick the brains of app creators that I admired including the co-founder of Shazam, Tapbots, Crossy Road, etc and that changed everything.

Now I run an app marketing agency where we’ve helped 8 clients get featured by Apple, 5X downloads with ASO, and get coverage on Techcrunch, Mashable, Venture Beat and other major publications. I also write about apps on The Next Web, Entrepreneur.com, and on my blog AppMasters.co.

Latest posts by Steve Young (see all)